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Lately I've been working up a few items from free patterns I've found online. Though all of my items in my shop are created using my own designs, I think that sometimes it's good to make things from other's patterns. This helps me learn new techniques, shapes, and challenges me to work outside of my comfort zone (plus I've been wanting to branch out into making baby items but know nothing about baby sizing - this is a great way to learn) - though I must admit - I usually end up modifying them all in varying degrees to suit my tastes! This tutorial is really a modification and is based off of this pattern (you may have to be registered to view) found on the Lion yarn site. Since I had a lot of this bulky yarn on hand, I modified it to work with what I had, plus bulky yarn items are so popular these days. I also wanted mine to be a headwrap style instead of sewing ribbons to tie, so I modified it to add the band. Simple changes, but thought I'd share my process with you guys.

Materials:

1 skein Lion Brand Hometown USA in your color choice (I'm using Dallas Grey here)

Size-P crochet hook

Yarn needle

Scissors

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To begin, ch 24.

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In 4th chain from hook, work dc. Dc in each chain across.

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Repeat this process to make three strips of equal size.



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Once you have your three strips made, stack them all on top of each other.



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Push your hook through all three strips and join them together with three slip stitches.



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Once your three strips are joined. Clip your yarn and finish off. Now you're ready to braid.



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Braid your strips as loose or as tight as you like


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Once you've finished your braid, stack the three strips at the end of your braid to join with three slip stitches - just as you did on the other end.



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Once you've joined your strips, do not finish off this time. Instead, ch 1 and work 3 sc across.


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Continue working *ch 1, sc in next 3 sts* for 12 more rows (13 rows total) to create the band.


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Once your band is finished, join with sl sts to opposite side of braid to form a circle.


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Using your yarn needle weave in your ends.



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Wear and enjoy!

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I think I might try another version using a smaller hook and tighter stitches since I think this might make the braid stand out even more. If I do I'll be sure to update you all and let it know how it turns out. Feel free to share the items you've made - I'd love to see!

P.S. Did you know that Lion has granted permission to sell items made from their patterns (though, of course, you can't sell the patterns themselves or use their photos as they're copyrighted)? I just discovered this via Ravelry, and once I looked through their patterns I was surprised at how many patterns I recognized listed in other folks shops! Not that there's anything wrong with that since the permission has been granted - but it does bug a little that some of these folks are parading around as knitwear designers in blog interviews and such when they're really just making things from the patterns of others. Oh well, to each their own. I may list some of the things I make from these patterns for sale in my shop (as long as permission to sell has been given), but feel like I want to make it clear which designs are from my own patterns and which arent or are modified derivatives. Just not sure how to quite word it yet. Any advice? What are your thoughts? As a buyer would you want to know? Does it matter or should I not worry with it? I feel since I do present myself as a crochet designer that it would be important to discern which was 100% mine and which was a derivative work.

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